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Chinese New Year celebration in Liverpool with Doctor Robert Wong and controversy over shariah laws from Dr R WILLIAMS Archbishop of Canterbury in UK
 
ANTSIRANANA 080208-1
February 8, 2008

[Diocese of Antsiranana - Indian Ocean] Bishop Roger Chung Jaomalaza was welcomed in Liverpool by Doctor Robert Wong and his wife Monica who were formerly from the Holy Trinity Parish in Mauritius .
The Chinese New year was celebrated on 7th Feb 2008 and that fell one day after Ash Wednesday this year.
Bishop Roger visited the old fortified town of Chester where King Charles lost his battle in the 16th cent.
The Bishop also visited St Nicholas Church of England school in Liverpool, and met the year 3 class taught by Miss Lamb and spent time teaching the students.

Visits to historic sites of this former major UK port were initiated . Bishop Roger also saw the Nutcracker Ballet of Tchaikovsky by a Russian Troupe at the Liverpool Empire Theatre.

The confused situation caused by the Most Rev Rowan Williams, the Archbishop of Canterbury pronouncement of the Shariah Law to be " included "i n the English Law is now causing great upheaval in the Religious and State relationship in UK.
Bishop Nazir Ali of Rochester has also received death threats following a comment he made that " some places are no go areas for non -M......". This is a time of great mind-searching and debate within the Church of England as Bishop Roger Chung Jaomalaza spends some time as a guest in the UK.
British news follows...

11/02/2008 06:28
The Archbishop of Canterbury is expected to defend himself after the angry response to his comments on sharia law.

Rowan Williams is likely to mention the row during his presidential address to the General Synod in London.

He has been embroiled in controversy since Thursday for claiming the adoption of elements of Islamic legal codes in the UK "seems unavoidable".

At least two Synod members have called for Dr Williams to go and he has faced criticism from leading bishops, secular groups and government figures. The Synod has powers to hold emergency debates over matters of concern within the Church, but sources have said these are rare.

Reports on Sunday night said the Archbishop would directly address the furore over his comments.

The Guardian quoted Lambeth Palace officials as suggesting he was prepared to improvise the 30-minute address to clarify his position over the row, when he had originally planned to speak mainly about the ordeal of Christians living under Robert Mugabe's regime in Zimbabwe.

Criticism of his comments continued to mount over the weekend. His predecessor Lord (George) Carey wrote in the News of the World: "He has in my opinion overstated the case for accommodating Islamic legal codes.

"His conclusion that Britain will eventually have to concede some place in law for aspects of sharia is a view I cannot share."

But Lord Carey also defended the Archbishop, saying: "This is
not a matter upon which Dr Williams should resign. He is a great leader in the Anglican tradition and he has a very important role to play in the Church.

"He has my full support. I telephoned him to say this to him and to tell him he is in my prayers. I understand he is horrified by what has happened."

The Archbishop of Canterbury is expected to defend himself after the angry response to his comments on sharia law.

Rowan Williams is likely to mention the row during his presidential address to the General Synod in London.

He has been embroiled in controversy since Thursday for claiming the adoption of elements of Islamic legal codes in the UK "seems unavoidable".

At least two Synod members have called for Dr Williams to go and he has faced criticism from leading bishops, secular groups and government figures. The Synod has powers to hold emergency debates over matters of concern within the Church, but sources have said these are rare.

Reports on Sunday night said the Archbishop would directly address the furore over his comments.

The Guardian quoted Lambeth Palace officials as suggesting he was prepared to improvise the 30-minute address to clarify his position over the row, when he had originally planned to speak mainly about the ordeal of Christians living under Robert Mugabe's regime in Zimbabwe.

Criticism of his comments continued to mount over the weekend. His predecessor Lord (George) Carey wrote in the News of the World: "He has in my opinion overstated the case for accommodating Islamic legal codes.

"His conclusion that Britain will eventually have to concede some place in law for aspects of sharia is a view I cannot share."

But Lord Carey also defended the Archbishop, saying: "This is not a matter upon which Dr Williams should resign. He is a great leader in the Anglican tradition and he has a very important role to play in the Church.

"He has my full support. I telephoned him to say this to him and to tell him he is in my prayers. I understand he is horrified by what has happened."

2008 The Press Association Limited


Last Updated: Monday, 11 February 2008, 04:30 GMT

Williams to face Anglican leaders

Dr Rowan Williams will address the Anglican General Synod
The Archbishop of Canterbury is due to address the Church of England's General Synod amid criticism of his remarks on Muslim Sharia law.
Dr Rowan Williams faced calls for him to quit after he implied some aspects of Sharia could be adopted in the UK.

BBC religious correspondent Robert Pigott says some traditionalist members of the Synod could ask for the issue to be debated, but that this was unlikely.

The Times says Gordon Brown has asked Dr Williams to clarify his remarks.

It says the prime minister telephoned the archbishop and encouraged him to clarify his remarks, where he felt they may have been misinterpreted.

Confidence in the leadership of the Anglican church has plummeted

Archbishop Gregory Venables


Q and A: Sharia law explained
Sharia law around the world

According to the Guardian Lambeth Palace indicated that the archbishop was prepared to improvise the 30-minute address, when he had previously intended to speak about the difficulties facing Christians in Zimbabwe.

Dr Williams sparked a major row after saying, in a BBC Radio 4 interview last week, that the adoption of parts of the law was "unavoidable" in Britain.

He has insisted he was not advocating a parallel set of laws but has faced calls for his resignation.


Archbishop Gregory Venables is Primate of the Southern Cone, which is made up of seven dioceses across South America.

He said Dr Williams's comments were a "surprise".

Synod criticism

"Taken within the context of other things that have been said and done in recent months, it will just add to the general sense that confidence in the leadership of the Anglican Church has plummeted," he said.


At home Dr Williams's remarks were criticised from his predecessor as the Church of England's leader, Lord Carey.

On Sunday, he said the acceptance of some Muslim laws would be "disastrous" for Britain.

But, writing in the News of the World, Lord Carey said his successor should not be forced to quit.

Two Synod members called for Dr Williams to stand down following his remarks.

Colonel Edward Armitstead, a member from the diocese of Bath and Wells, said Dr Williams should move to work in a university setting instead of leading the Anglican Church.

Alison Ruoff, a Synod member from London, said he was "very able, a brilliant scholar as a man" but in terms of being a leader of the Christian community "he's actually at the moment a disaster".